Living Alone Can Kill You

Well, living alone won’t kill you directly or immediately – but living alone is less healthy, physically, than living with others or at least having a lively social life. According to studies of brain function, the more social we are, the longer we live—and the better quality of life we enjoy. One four-year study conducted by researchers at Harvard Medical School followed almost 45,000 people who had heart disease or were at high risk of developing it. The finding? Those who lived alone were more likely to die from heart attack, stroke, or other heart-related problems than those who lived with others.

Like I said, living alone can kill you, or at least it can reduce your chances of living a longer, healthier life.

Currently, 37% of women in the U.S. over 65 live by themselves. And think about this too – studies have shown that older women who are married are less likely to have a strong social circle of their own than older women who live alone; leaving those married women in danger of isolation and loneliness should they lose their spouse to divorce or death later on.

The take-away here is that it’s important to sustain strong friendships and social ties, and to grow new ones if your circle of friends is small or the ties not so strong. In other words, quality time with good friends is good for you whether you live alone or not. And if you’re more of a homebody than a get-out-and-go type of person, then living alone is probably the worst choice you can make -for your health, anyway. Living with a roommate who suits your personality and style of living could be the smartest choice you could make for your health and happiness.

Bottom line – You may or may not opt for living alone as a choice, but make sure you don’t also opt for living lonely.

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